Multisensory Marketing

Multisensory Marketing: addressed to the 5 senses

Multisensory MarketingConsumers are exposed to about 200 visual advertising messages a day, which has reduced the response to such stimuli. On the other hand, the other senses have a wider influence, both consciously and subconsciously, as we are less accustomed to marketing activities that target them. That is why we believe it is very convenient for brands  to focus on multisensory marketing strategy, that is, directed to the 5 senses

Advertising  thought that the most important thing of an ad is pleasing to the eye, but the truth is that when it comes to convincing consumers isn´t just go to one of the senses. A report released by Shullman Research Center emphasizes that if we have five sense is for some reason, so the most effective strategy is the one that consider all of them: sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch.

While the view is the most important for 74% of consumers sense, the other senses are also important. This statement is noted in the case of luxury brands, as consumers are least prioritize the sense of sight in marketing campaigns. For these sight and hearing lose relatively importance in favor of touch, taste, and smell.

Addressing men and women also changes the importance of each of the senses.While 85% of women placed in sight as the first or second most important in making a purchasing decision sense, only 79% of men think so. More data are similar in the case of hearing, touch and smell, but also differ in taste (21% of men placed him as the first or second most important sense, while only 17% of women agree the same).

Especially in food and beverage brands is a good idea to bet to multisensory experiences, marketing tactics that go beyond extolling “flavor” or “appearance,” allowing consumers to interact with the products of various shapes and using every way (for example, touching the ingredients with closed eyes, smell before tasting them, making music with them, etc).

Brands that make an impact on consumers by appealing to unusual ways are increasing. Examples of the above are the smell of fresh bread at the supermarket or the smell of wood in luxury cars (although there is no wood inside).

Is your brand sufficiently directed to the 5 senses of consumers?

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